Lamkin teacher attends Teacher Institute on Art of the Renaissance in Washington, D.C.

July 26, 2017

Jeanna Peña, a visual arts teacher at Lamkin Elementary School, attended the 2017 National Gallery of Art Teacher Institute on Art of the Renaissance in Washington, D.C. earlier this month. Fifty-three teachers from 20 state came together for a program to better strengthen their knowledge of art history and integrating it into the classroom.
Jeanna Peña, a visual arts teacher at Lamkin Elementary School, attended the 2017 National Gallery of Art Teacher Institute on Art of the Renaissance in Washington, D.C. earlier this month. Fifty-three teachers from 20 state came together for a program to better strengthen their knowledge of art history and integrating it into the classroom. 

July 26, 2017—Jeanna Peña, a visual arts teacher at Lamkin Elementary School, recently attended the 2017 National Gallery of Art Teacher Institute on Art of the Renaissance in Washington, D.C. She was one of only 53 teachers to come together from across 20 states for a program that emphasized the social and cultural context of Renaissance art in Italy and Northern European countries between the 14th and 16th centuries, and how to integrate visual art into classroom teaching.

“I feel extremely fortunate to have been selected for this fellowship opportunity and I am excited to bring a new skill set to our students that focuses on critical thinking taught through visual literacy, object-based learning, historical context and geographical awareness,” said Peña, who attended the July 10-15 seminar. “All are crucial in building true global citizens with multidimensional knowledge.”

Peña and other seminar participants studied works by leading Renaissance artists in the National Gallery of Art’s permanent collection, including by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael and Titian. It the development of oil-painting techniques, the role of prints in disseminating new ideas, using art as primary resources in classroom instruction, strengthening students’ visual literacy, and incorporating art into interdisciplinary teaching.

In addition, a demonstration of Venetian painting techniques and a visit to a printmaker’s studio at Georgetown University were part of the program.

To date, more than 2,600 teachers have participated in the program. 

“Along with the National Gallery of Art educators, Julie Springer and Justina Yee, I would also like to thank the Annetta J. and Robert M. Coffelt Sr. and Robert M. Coffelt Jr. Endowment Fellowship for supporting education and making opportunities like this available to educators,” Peña said. “I appreciate all that you have done to help me grow and hone my craft!”

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