Bridgeland High School sophomore receives Girl Scout Gold Award

September 10, 2020

Bridgeland High School sophomore Grace Roffall received the Girl Scout Gold Award for her Take Action Project “Cello Made Easy,” which provided free cello lessons to four beginning cello students at Smith Middle School.
Bridgeland High School sophomore Grace Roffall received the Girl Scout Gold Award for her Take Action Project “Cello Made Easy,” which provided free cello lessons to four beginning cello students at Smith Middle School.

Sept. 10, 2020—Bridgeland High School sophomore Grace Roffall received the Girl Scout Gold Award in June for her Take Action Project, “Cello Made Easy,” which provided free private cello lessons to four beginning cello students at Smith Middle School.  

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest recognition a Girl Scout can earn. Requirements for the Gold Award include completing Girl Scout Senior or Girl Scout Ambassador Journeys and completing a Take Action Project. For the Take Action Project, an individual Girl Scout chooses a project that addresses the needs of others in the community. Projects must produce sustainable results and include the help of a Gold Advisor and a Gold Team to help guide, plan and carry out the project.

“I chose to help others with cello lessons because I saw a need for lessons among students in my community who may not have easy access to them,” Roffall said. “Since getting my cello bow, I have been fortunate to receive private lessons. This helped me realize that when cellists have more support, they gain the confidence and skills to be the best players they can be.”

Roffall started playing cello in sixth grade and is currently a member of the Symphonic Orchestra at Bridgeland. Sadie Awad, head orchestra director at Smith, was Roffall’s Gold Advisor and saw how Roffall’s lessons helped her students.

In addition to providing free private lessons, Roffall posted cello lessons on her YouTube channel to reach a wider audience. Roffall also planned a Bring-A-Friend day, where students were taught how to play “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” Pictured, from left, are Sadie Awad, Smith Middle School head orchestra director, Amara McCann, cello student, Logan Nagy, cello student, Becka Hale, cello student and Grace Roffall. In addition to providing free private lessons, Roffall posted cello lessons on her YouTube channel to reach a wider audience. Roffall also planned a Bring-A-Friend day, where students were taught how to play “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” Pictured, from left, are Sadie Awad, Smith Middle School head orchestra director, Amara McCann, cello student, Logan Nagy, cello student, Becka Hale, cello student and Grace Roffall.

“Having Grace work with some of our students multiple times a week was so wonderful,” Awad said. “The fact that she was offering lessons for free at our school and after school hours opened up the option of lessons to so many students who normally wouldn’t have been able to do private lessons. I know that the time Grace spent with those kids was invaluable and made a world of difference for them.”

In addition to providing private lessons, Roffall posted instructional videos on her YouTube channel to reach a wider audience. Roffall and her Gold Team also planned a Bring-A-Friend day, where students were taught how to play “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.”

“I know my project made a difference because my students consistently showed up for lessons and their skills improved at an expected rate,” Roffall said. “They also demonstrated their skills by teaching their friends how to play a song on the cello on Bring-A-Friend day. After finishing my project, all of my students reported that lessons helped them and my YouTube videos have received many views, meaning that I did reach a wider audience. After I finished my project, two of the four students I helped asked to continue lessons.”

Visit the Girl Scouts website for more information.

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