Cypress Creek inducts three alumni into 2018 Wall of Honor class

May 29, 2018

Cypress Creek High School alumni, from left, Blaine Tompkins, Bradley Myles and Dr. Chris Hutchinson were enshrined as the Class of 2018 on the school’s Wall of Honor at a reception May 22.
Cypress Creek High School alumni, from left, Blaine Tompkins, Bradley Myles and Dr. Chris Hutchinson were enshrined as the Class of 2018 on the school’s Wall of Honor at a reception May 22.

May 29, 2018—Three alumni were inducted into the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor during a recognition ceremony at the school May 22.

Jim Wells, retired Cypress Creek High School principal and chair of the Wall of Honor committee, presents the first of three members of the 2018 Wall of Honor class to honorees and guests at the school May 22.
Jim Wells, retired Cypress Creek High School principal and chair of the Wall of Honor committee, presents the first of three members of the 2018 Wall of Honor class to honorees and guests at the school May 22.

The Wall of Honor recognizes lifetime achievements and significant contributions made by former students dating back to the opening of Cypress Creek for the 1976-1977 school year.

A Wall of Honor committee consisting of current and former principals, counselors and Cypress Creek staff selected the following three graduates to be inducted into the 2018 class:

  • Dr. Chris Hutchinson, class of 1988;
  • Bradley Myles, class of 1998; and
  • Blaine Tompkins, class of 1990.

Dr. Chris Hutchinson stands next to his plaque following his enshrinement on the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor at a reception at the school May 22. The 1988 graduate and former football standout starred at the University of Michigan, where he attended medical school after forgoing a potential NFL career.
Dr. Chris Hutchinson stands next to his plaque following his enshrinement on the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor at a reception at the school May 22. The 1988 graduate and former football standout starred at the University of Michigan, where he attended medical school after forgoing a potential NFL career.

Dr. Chris Hutchinson continued a football career from Cypress Creek to the University of Michigan, where the defensive lineman and freshman All-American was a part of five Big Ten Conference championships and four Rose Bowl appearances, winning two. As a senior, he set a program record for single season sack yardage (99) and tied the mark for single season sacks (11).

After attending rookie camp with the Cleveland Browns in 1993, Dr. Hutchinson opted to forego professional football in favor of attending the University of Michigan Medical School. He later graduated from the Emergency Medicine Residency and earned the Outstanding Resident Achievement Award from William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich. Dr. Hutchinson works today as an assistant professor at the Oakland University Beaumont School of Medicine and practices emergency medicine.

“When you’re going through the process and going through high school, you have no perspective on the long term – what you’ll be doing in 20 years,” Dr. Hutchinson said. “To have that plaque on the wall and have my family here with me is just a great experience. I was an underachiever and I realized in college that in order for me to succeed, I had to overachieve and when I finally realized what I need to do for that, my career took off.”

Bradley Myles stands next to his plaque following his enshrinement on the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor at a reception at the school May 22. The 1998 graduate is CEO of the Polaris Project, a nonprofit organization that works to combat and prevent human trafficking and modern-day slavery.
Bradley Myles stands next to his plaque following his enshrinement on the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor at a reception at the school May 22. The 1998 graduate is CEO of the Polaris Project, a nonprofit organization that works to combat and prevent human trafficking and modern-day slavery.

Bradley Myles is the CEO of the Polaris Project, a nonprofit organization that works to combat and prevent human trafficking and modern-day slavery. Since stepping i to the role, he’s led the way to Polaris tripling its revenue and growing to more than 100 employees. Myles has consulted on and helped launch national trafficking hotlines in Mexico, Canada and the United Kingdom, and has advocated for the passage of over 100 anti-trafficking laws at the state level.

He attended Stanford University following his high school graduation and conducted the country’s first national needs assessment for survivors of trafficking in 2002-2003. Bradley is a founding member of the Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking. His latest of numerous accolades was being awarded the prestigious Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2017.

“It feels like coming full circle,” Myles said. “It takes on an extra meaning when it comes from a place that played a role in shaping you. When you win an award out in the world, it may just be an external award. It’s different because you might be meeting them for the first time.

“But when you come back here, these are the people that shaped you and these are the people that knew you. The tie to the past and the present brings on an extra meaning.”

Blaine Tompkins stands next to his plaque following his enshrinement on the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor at a reception at the school May 22. The 1990 graduate served 21 years as a U.S. Navy and Air Force pilot and amassed nearly 250 combat flight hours. He founded Air Tech Armour and has obtained two patents.
Blaine Tompkins stands next to his plaque following his enshrinement on the Cypress Creek High School Wall of Honor at a reception at the school May 22. The 1990 graduate served 21 years as a U.S. Navy and Air Force pilot and amassed nearly 250 combat flight hours. He founded Air Tech Armour and has obtained two patents.

Blaine Tompkins joined the U.S. Navy following his education at Texas A&M University and later in Italy and Rice University. He served as a lieutenant commander for 11 years, completing two combat deployments from the USS Constellation, and later served 10 years as an Air Force lieutenant colonel and deployed to Iraq’s Balad Air Force Base. He amassed 245 combat flight hours and was chosen as a F/A 18-F Super Hornet Airshow demonstration pilot.

Toward the end of his military career, Tompkins was asked by Lockheed Martin to work on the newest fighter aircraft as a pilot subject matter expert. In 2011, he founded Air Armour Tech, a company that designs cases which use air as the basis of protection, and obtained two patents. Tompkins also continues philanthropic work from his time in the military, participating in the Wishes for Warriors and the Vets’ Xtreme Adventures programs.

“This means a lot because this is where you started and for me, it was making mistakes and pushing the envelope where you have a huge safety net,” Tompkins said. “There’s nothing more carefree than high school. So for this award to come from the place that started forming me in the last days going into adulthood is an honor.”

 

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