Duryea ES honors history with National Park Service traveling exhibit

March 29, 2018

Duryea Elementary School administrators pose in front of the National Park Service Traveling Banner Exhibition featuring Colonel Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers, which the school brought in as part of its program in February to honor Black History Month. In the photo (from left) are: Mark Duncan, Duryea assistant principal; Kenneth Henry, Duryea principal; Carlos Joseph, Duryea librarian; Felicia Thomas, Duryea assistant principal; and Danielle Patton, Duryea counselor and the school’s Black History Program coordinator.
Duryea Elementary School administrators pose in front of the National Park Service Traveling Banner Exhibition featuring Colonel Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers, which the school brought in as part of its program in February to honor Black History Month. In the photo (from left) are: Mark Duncan, Duryea assistant principal; Kenneth Henry, Duryea principal; Carlos Joseph, Duryea librarian; Felicia Thomas, Duryea assistant principal; and Danielle Patton, Duryea counselor and the school’s Black History Program coordinator.

March 29, 2018—Among the many celebrations across Cypress-Fairbanks ISD in February to honor Black History Month was the annual program at Duryea Elementary School, which was held Feb. 28.

For its 2018 program, Duryea featured a salute to Historically Black Colleges and Universities and also housed a display in its library of the National Park Service Traveling Banner Exhibition featuring Colonel Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers. These important figures helped shape and make the careers in the military and the nation’s National Parks possible for African-American men and women.

The exhibition was established in 2016 as part of the centennial celebration of the National Park Service and 150th anniversary of the Buffalo Soldiers becoming a separate group within the U.S. Army.

The idea came from Shatonya Marshall, Duryea administrative secretary, after a conversation of the school’s Black History Program with Danielle Patton, Duryea counselor and the program’s coordinator.

“The exhibit was extremely educational for our students,” Patton said. “We have never had resources that provided so much literature and enrichment for them to have as keepsakes and references.”

To help celebrate Black History Month in February, Duryea Elementary School featured a salute to Historically Black Colleges and Universities and also housed a display of the National Park Service Traveling Banner Exhibition featuring Colonel Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers. In addition to the four banners, the National Park Service donated resource materials, which included writing tablets, a four-card collection of civil rights collector’s cards, and comic books, bookmarks and brochures that outlined Young’s childhood, educational journey to the U.S. Military Academy and his life as a Buffalo Soldier.
To help celebrate Black History Month in February, Duryea Elementary School featured a salute to Historically Black Colleges and Universities and also housed a display of the National Park Service Traveling Banner Exhibition featuring Colonel Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers. In addition to the four banners, the National Park Service donated resource materials, which included writing tablets, a four-card collection of civil rights collector’s cards, and comic books, bookmarks and brochures that outlined Young’s childhood, educational journey to the U.S. Military Academy and his life as a Buffalo Soldier.

Each grade level rotated through the library to view the display and a historical video, giving the students the opportunity to learn about the lives and legacies of Young and the Buffalo Soldiers. The National Park Service donated resource materials for each student, which included writing tablets, a four-card collection of civil rights collector’s cards, and comic books, bookmarks and brochures that outlined Young’s childhood, educational journey to the U.S. Military Academy and his life as a Buffalo Soldier.

The exhibit was also on display during an evening program, giving family and community members who attended the opportunity see it as well.

“The reaction from the students was awesome,” Patton said. “They had no knowledge of the Buffalo Soldiers or Col. Young. Unfortunately, this is an era of history that is not taught to our children. We were elated to bring this piece of African-American History onto our campus for them.”

 

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