Former longtime educator recognized at Carpenter Center dedication

November 16, 2017

Maybelline Forbes Carpenter, former CFISD longtime educator, acknowledges friends, family and former colleagues at the dedication for Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.
Maybelline Forbes Carpenter, former CFISD longtime educator, acknowledges friends, family and former colleagues at the dedication for Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov.  12.

Nov. 16, 2017—The CFISD community gathered Nov. 12 to celebrate the namesake of the district’s Adaptive Behavior Center at the dedication ceremony for the Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center.

The campus is named in honor of longtime CFISD educator Maybelline Forbes Carpenter, who spent 36 of her 42 years in education in CFISD before retiring from the district in December 2014.

Dr. Mark Hendry, CFISD superintendent, and Board President Darcy Mingoia unveil a portrait of Maybelline Carpenter, the namesake of Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center, at the dedication ceremony Nov. 12.
Dr. Mark Hendry, CFISD superintendent, and Board President Darcy Mingoia unveil a portrait of Maybelline Carpenter, the namesake of Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center, at the dedication ceremony Nov. 12.

Carpenter began her career teaching in her hometown of Bolivar, Tenn. at the Western State Mental Institute where she taught emotionally disturbed children and youth for one year. The next year, she became the evening director.

Carpenter then moved and spent two years in the Memphis City School System before she and her husband relocated to Houston. She joined Houston Independent School District and continued teaching students with special needs.

The Praise Dancers from Greater New Solomon Temple Church of God in Christ performs during a dedication for the Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.
The Praise Dancers from Greater New Solomon Temple Church of God in Christ performs during a dedication for the Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.

On a recommendation from a friend, Carpenter interviewed with CFISD and went on to spend the next 36 years as a teacher at the Clara Scott Learning Scott, later renamed the Adaptive Behavior Center. Carpenter was named a supervisor in 1983 and promoted to director in 1992.

“Those kids that didn’t have a voice that needed a spokesperson, that needed a mommy, an aunt, a cheerleader, she was the one that could do that,” said Dr. Deborah Stewart, associate superintendent for human resources and student services.

Jordan Forbes Carpenter, the son of Maybelline Forbes Carpenter, speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.
Jordan Forbes Carpenter, the son of Maybelline Forbes Carpenter, speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.

Added Carpenter Center Director Chad Perry: “She worked tirelessly on their behalf and thousands of students have benefitted from her leadership. Having the center renamed the Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center is a capstone to a long and fruitful career. It is an honor and a privilege to be the director here.”

The dedication program included opening remarks and introductions from Perry and CFISD Superintendent Dr. Mark Henry. The Greater New Solomon Temple Church of God in Christ Praise Dancers, under the direction of Soror S. Landry, performed for guests and attendees, before guest speakers Angela King, Jordan Forbes Carpenter and Dr. Cheryl Salyards addressed the crowd. Following a video tribute created by CFISD Cinema staff, Board President Darcy Mingoia proclaimed the dedication to Carpenter, who closed with an acknowledgement.

Maybelline Forbes Carpenter (right), former CFISD longtime educator, smiles with Darcy Mingoia, Board president, after Mingoia read a proclamation at the dedication for Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.
Maybelline Forbes Carpenter (right), former CFISD longtime educator, smiles with Darcy Mingoia, Board president, after Mingoia read a proclamation at the dedication for Maybelline Forbes Carpenter Center on Nov. 12.  

“My parents are no longer living but they would be the proudest of this moment,” Carpenter said. “And they would appreciate this more than I do because we grew up on a farm. They always wanted the best for my sisters and me, and to see your name on a building would be quite special.”

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